There are many options for supporting AOS’s mission. Explore what’s right for you!

By Check

Checks may be made out to the American Ornithological Society and mailed to the American Ornithological Society, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605.


Recurring Monthly Donation

You can increase your impact on AOS’s programs by choosing to have your donation in any amount recur automatically every month. When you donate through PayPal, check the box labeled “Make this a monthly donation” and follow the instructions to authorize your recurring payment.


Employer Matching

Many employers have a program to match employees’ charitable gifts. Check with your employer to see if they have an employee matching gift program. If so, there will likely be required forms to fill out, and your employer can assist you as necessary. Mail your matching gift form to Crystal Ruiz, American Ornithological Society, 1400 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605.

Another type of employer benefit is volunteer grant programs, which are corporate giving programs in which companies provide monetary donations to organizations where employees volunteer regularly. If you volunteer your time for AOS (for example, as a member of a committee), this is another potential way to multiply your support! As with charitable gift matching programs, check with your employer to see if this is an option for you.

For questions on how to submit an employeer matching gift or volunteer grant to AOS, please contact us.


Stocks, Bonds, & Mutual Funds

Many gifts of appreciated stocks, bonds, and mutual funds result in a charitable deduction for the full market value of your contribution to AOS, even if you acquired the asset for far less. Donating securities also minimizes capital gains taxes. If you are considering a donation of this type, please contact us and we will provide you with the information needed for this type of gift transaction.


Charitable IRA Rollover

If you are 70½ or older, you may transfer up to $100,000 from your IRA to AOS​. The amount of the transfer will not be included in your taxable income, and the transferred amount can count toward the IRA’s required minimum distribution for the year. This opportunity applies only to certain types of IRAs. Please consult with your financial advisor to see whether a charitable IRA rollover is a good choice for you.

IRA rollover gifts may be done via wire transfer or by check. Ask your IRA custodian to contact us for wire transfer information, or direct them to mail a check payable to the American Ornithological Society to the address above. Please include your name, the purpose of your gift, and confirmation that the funds are from a qualified charitable IRA distribution.


Life Insurance

You may transfer ownership of a life insurance policy to AOS and receive a tax deduction for the policy’s cash value. Gifts to AOS to cover premiums due may also qualify for a deduction. For information regarding this type of gift, please contact us.


Shop at Amazon

AmazonSmile offers a simple and automatic way for you to support AOS every time you shop, at no cost to you. You will find the same low prices, selection, and shopping experience with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to AOS.

    From the field

    I hope you enjoyed this week’s posts! It has been fun working with the many great people who’ve helped make this project happen, and it’s exciting to consider all the research and conservation possibilities that lie ahead. I’ve been focusing on Spotted and Barred Owl ecology, but next year I’m joining @cornellbirds to tackle the challenge of identifying the vocalizations of potentially hundreds of other species that are in the raw audio! Can anyone identify any species in that spectrogram? Photos by Kevin Wood, @whatbirdisthis, & me. #birds #wildlife #science #outdoors #ornithology #birdsong #birdcalls
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[Thanks, @cmmwood! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]Barred Owls are more territorial than Spotted Owls, and having tagged both I can confirm that this aggression carries over to their behavior when handled. I was fortunate to occasionally work with Dennis Rock, who has a wealth of owl capturing experience. When a Barred Owl chomped down on his finger, he told me to just leave it because it would then be easier for me to finish tagging the bird! However, the next season when I took a full fist of talons to my palm, I definitely fixed the problem right away. Later that night we created gloves that provided some protection without impairing dexterity. Photos by @nkryshak. #ornithology #birds #owls #wildlife #science #conservation
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[Our thank to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]Two years of acoustic surveys showed that the Barred Owl population had increased by a factor of 2.6, which was very concerning. We deployed GPS tags on ten individuals to test the possibility that the population estimates were inflated by a few highly mobile (and very vocal) individuals. All the birds we tagged displayed very stable territories, suggesting that the population had indeed grown between years. This represents a major challenge for Spotted Owl conservation in the Sierra Nevada. For more about this research, check out the press release, linked in AOS's profile! Photo courtesy of @u.s.forestservice. #ornithology #birds #owls #wildlife #science #conservation
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[Our thank to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]We deployed passive recording units designed and built by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (@cornellbirds). Once the raw audio data was back at base, we compressed the files and copied them onto two sets of hard drives — better safe than sorry! This is a boring part of the job, but when you’re collecting 30 TB of data each year, careful management is really important. We then scanned the data for the vocalizations of Spotted and Barred Owls, and those results allowed us to develop multi-season occupancy models for both species. Picture three is a spectrogram, or visual representation of sound, of a Spotted Owl “four-note” call. Photos by me. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #owls
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[Our thank to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]To assess the status of the Sierra Nevada Barred Owl population, we conducted passive acoustic surveys across over 6,000 square kilometers of mountainous terrain in the Lassen and Plumas National Forests. This meant some great campsite views and, for better or worse, accessing some sites with fatbikes! Photos by me. #ornithology #wildlife #science #ecology #owls #california
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[Our thanks to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]Over the last century, Barred Owls (first picture) have expanded from their historic range in eastern North America and are now found throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California. Long-term studies have shown that they outcompete their smaller cousin, the Spotted Owl (second picture). Barred Owls have been documented sporadically in the northern Sierra Nevada since the late 1980s, but until my teams conducted our acoustic surveys, there was no concrete data on their density and distribution in the region. Photos by @dannyhofstadter and myself. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #owls #science #conservation #ecology
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[Our thanks to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]Hi everyone, I’m Connor Wood (@cmmwood), a PhD student at @uwmadison and AOS member, and I’ll be taking over AOS’s account this week! I use bioacoustics to study Spotted Owls and Barred Owls in California’s Sierra Nevada. Recent advances in bioacoustic hardware and software have opened up exciting new research possibilities in the last few years. I’ll be sharing some photos from my dissertation research, which was the first landscape-scale multi-species owl surveys in the U.S. One paper emerging from that project will be published by AOS’s The Condor this week. Photo by @the.jade.heron. #ornithology #wildlife #birds #owls #science #scientist #stem
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