AOS is passionate about ornithology and wants to promote ornithological research through our social media channels that support our mission. AOS maintains active accounts on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. We share news and information about ornithological research without bias and give credit to researchers whose research we post about. AOS follows an opt-out social media policy, in which individuals must opt out if they do not want their research to be shared. AOS can share published research via our social media channels without consent.

Research presented at conferences can also be shared via social media by AOS or conference attendees unless the presenter(s) has opted out of social media. Photos of slides and materials at conferences can be used in any social media channel unless the presenter has opted out by placing a “no social media” symbol (example below) on their slides or materials. It is up to individual speakers and presenters to alert people of what they do not want posted, whether it is content, pictures, or something else. If a presenter uses the “no social media” symbol, we ask that conference attendees respect the individual’s wishes to help protect the privacy of both people and their research. However, we acknowledge that preventing conference attendees from commenting or live tweeting is extremely difficult and not a role or responsibility of AOS.

To help audience members during conferences, we recommend that presenters include their personal or project social media handle on every slide to encourage sharing and allow for easier networking. For those without a personal or project social media handle, consider including the conference hashtag or a social media icon such as the twitter icon to let people know that you are supportive of others posting.

Social Media Opt-Out symbol (Twitter example):

icon to indicate no social media sharing

AOS Commenting Policy

Anyone may participate in the conversations on AOS’s social media channels. In order to encourage civil communication, the following policy applies to all postings on AOS’s social media channels.

AOS reserves the right to delete posts or comments containing spam, irrelevant remarks, or items that do not align with the mission and integrity of the AOS. Personal attacks, promotion of violence, promotion of illegal activities, offensive material, or profanity will not be tolerated and will be deleted immediately. AOS reserves the right to ban users who violate this policy.

AOS encourages our members to participate on our social media channels and we hope these rules will facilitate a lively and respectful conversation about birds and ornithology.

    From the field

    Do you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current Elective Councilor Lauryn Benedict has to say about her experience so far. Nominations are due November 29, and you can find more details at the link in our profile!Climate change means spring is arriving earlier in the Arctic, but not all Arctic-breeding geese are affected the same way — some (such as the Barnacle Goose pictured here) successfully produce more offspring in years with earlier springs, but some produce fewer. New research published in The Auk suggests that this is because timing of spring has different effects on two different stages of the breeding cycle: the pre-laying, laying, and nesting phase, and the hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile phase. When snow melts earlier, more geese initiate a nest, their clutch size is larger, and the chance that the eggs will hatch increases. However, the second stage (hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile) is negatively affected by earlier springs, because food quality is already declining by the time the eggs hatch, creating a trophic mismatch. Photo by Michiel Boom. #ornithology #science #nature #wildlife #birds #geese #conservation #ecology #climatechange #arcticDo you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current President-Elect Tom Sherry has to say about his experience so far. Nominations are due November 29!Thanks for letting me take over the AOS Instagram for a week! I hope I’ve given a good glimpse into my research and experiences. For all of the undergraduate ornithologists out there, I encourage you to strive for new horizons in your research! I plan on beginning a Master’s or PhD program in the fall of 2020 to continue my studies in ornithology. My future research interests include studying the genomic, behavioral, spatial, and morphological effects of hybridization and the formation of hybrid zones. #ornithology #science #wildlife #biology #birds #dogsofinstagram #womeninstem
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[Thanks, Angelica! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]As a lover of the outdoors, I find myself looking for new experiences wherever I can. In the summer of 2018, I took part in a study-abroad intensive led by Dr. McRae and Dr. Kyle Summers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. I engaged in daily and nightly hikes through Pipeline Road and Barro Colorado Island and conversed with the resident scientists about their current studies and long-term research goals on Barro Colorado Island. My experiences in the rainforest encouraged me to pursue work in wildlife biology and conservation. #science #conservation #biology #wildlife #ecology #panama #womeninstem #ornithology
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]I began conducting field research in 2017. Since then, I’ve developed valuable skills and knowledge needed for working safely and effectively in the field, both with others and on my own. I’ve found that I’m never quite finished learning from the people and birds that I work with! Both photos belong to Dr. Susan B. McRae. #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #bluebirds #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]As an undergraduate research assistant, I conduct routine nest checks of bluebird boxes. I enjoy watching the parents build nests through my binoculars! My thesis work investigates factors that affect nest size variation in a specific population of Eastern Bluebirds. I’ve found that the weights of the nests they build are positively correlated to mean daily maximum temperatures within boxes during the incubation period. I gave a poster presentation of my senior thesis work at the 2019 conference in Anchorage last summer! #AOSMember #ornithology #science #birds #wildlife #bluebirds #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]
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