AOS shares society news and promotes ornithology in general and the activities of our members in particular through our Twitter (@AmOrnith), Facebook (AmOrnith), and Instagram (@AmOrnith) accounts.

AOS may share published research and other publicly available items via our social media platforms without seeking consent from the authors. AOS members wishing to have specific work of theirs promoted via AOS social media platforms should contact AOS at info@americanornithology.org.

AOS Meetings

Research presented at AOS conferences maybe shared via social media by employees of AOS or conference attendees unless the presenter(s) specifically requests otherwise. Photos of slides and materials at conferences can be used in any social media platform unless the presenter has opted out by placing a “no social media” icon (an example can be found below) on their PowerPoint slides or materials. It is up to individual speakers and presenters to alert people about what they do not want posted, whether it is content, pictures, or something else. We ask that conference attendees respect individuals’ wishes to help protect the privacy of both people and their research. Preventing conference attendees from commenting or live tweeting, however, is extremely difficult and not a role or responsibility of AOS.  

To help audiences during conferences, we recommend that presenters include their personal or project social media handle on every slide to encourage sharing and allow for easier networking. For those without a personal or project social media handle, consider including the conference hashtag or a social media icon such as the Twitter icon to let people know that you are supportive of others posting.

Social Media Opt-Out symbol (Twitter example):

icon to indicate no social media sharing

AOS Commenting Policy

Anyone may participate in conversations on AOS’s social media platforms, blog post comments, etc. In order to encourage civil communication, the following policy applies to all postings on AOS communication platforms.

AOS reserves the right to delete posts or comments containing spam, irrelevant remarks, or items that do not align with the mission and integrity of AOS. Personal attacks, promotion of violence, promotion of illegal activities, offensive material, or profanity will not be tolerated and will be deleted immediately. AOS reserves the right to ban users who violate this policy. 

AOS encourages our members to participate on our social media platforms, and the goal of this policy is to facilitate a lively and respectful conversation about science, professional development, and ornithology.

Anyone may participate in the conversations on AOS’s social media channels. In order to encourage civil communication, the following policy applies to all postings on AOS’s social media channels.

AOS reserves the right to delete posts or comments containing spam, irrelevant remarks, or items that do not align with the mission and integrity of the AOS. Personal attacks, promotion of violence, promotion of illegal activities, offensive material, or profanity will not be tolerated and will be deleted immediately. AOS reserves the right to ban users who violate this policy.

AOS encourages our members to participate on our social media channels and we hope these rules will facilitate a lively and respectful conversation about birds and ornithology.

    From the field

    I hope you enjoyed this week’s posts! It has been fun working with the many great people who’ve helped make this project happen, and it’s exciting to consider all the research and conservation possibilities that lie ahead. I’ve been focusing on Spotted and Barred Owl ecology, but next year I’m joining @cornellbirds to tackle the challenge of identifying the vocalizations of potentially hundreds of other species that are in the raw audio! Can anyone identify any species in that spectrogram? Photos by Kevin Wood, @whatbirdisthis, & me. #birds #wildlife #science #outdoors #ornithology #birdsong #birdcalls
.
[Thanks, @cmmwood! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]Barred Owls are more territorial than Spotted Owls, and having tagged both I can confirm that this aggression carries over to their behavior when handled. I was fortunate to occasionally work with Dennis Rock, who has a wealth of owl capturing experience. When a Barred Owl chomped down on his finger, he told me to just leave it because it would then be easier for me to finish tagging the bird! However, the next season when I took a full fist of talons to my palm, I definitely fixed the problem right away. Later that night we created gloves that provided some protection without impairing dexterity. Photos by @nkryshak. #ornithology #birds #owls #wildlife #science #conservation
.
[Our thank to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]Two years of acoustic surveys showed that the Barred Owl population had increased by a factor of 2.6, which was very concerning. We deployed GPS tags on ten individuals to test the possibility that the population estimates were inflated by a few highly mobile (and very vocal) individuals. All the birds we tagged displayed very stable territories, suggesting that the population had indeed grown between years. This represents a major challenge for Spotted Owl conservation in the Sierra Nevada. For more about this research, check out the press release, linked in AOS's profile! Photo courtesy of @u.s.forestservice. #ornithology #birds #owls #wildlife #science #conservation
.
[Our thank to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]We deployed passive recording units designed and built by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (@cornellbirds). Once the raw audio data was back at base, we compressed the files and copied them onto two sets of hard drives — better safe than sorry! This is a boring part of the job, but when you’re collecting 30 TB of data each year, careful management is really important. We then scanned the data for the vocalizations of Spotted and Barred Owls, and those results allowed us to develop multi-season occupancy models for both species. Picture three is a spectrogram, or visual representation of sound, of a Spotted Owl “four-note” call. Photos by me. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #owls
.
[Our thank to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]To assess the status of the Sierra Nevada Barred Owl population, we conducted passive acoustic surveys across over 6,000 square kilometers of mountainous terrain in the Lassen and Plumas National Forests. This meant some great campsite views and, for better or worse, accessing some sites with fatbikes! Photos by me. #ornithology #wildlife #science #ecology #owls #california
.
[Our thanks to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]Over the last century, Barred Owls (first picture) have expanded from their historic range in eastern North America and are now found throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California. Long-term studies have shown that they outcompete their smaller cousin, the Spotted Owl (second picture). Barred Owls have been documented sporadically in the northern Sierra Nevada since the late 1980s, but until my teams conducted our acoustic surveys, there was no concrete data on their density and distribution in the region. Photos by @dannyhofstadter and myself. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #owls #science #conservation #ecology
.
[Our thanks to AOS member Connor Wood (@cmmwood), who's taking over this account for the week!]Hi everyone, I’m Connor Wood (@cmmwood), a PhD student at @uwmadison and AOS member, and I’ll be taking over AOS’s account this week! I use bioacoustics to study Spotted Owls and Barred Owls in California’s Sierra Nevada. Recent advances in bioacoustic hardware and software have opened up exciting new research possibilities in the last few years. I’ll be sharing some photos from my dissertation research, which was the first landscape-scale multi-species owl surveys in the U.S. One paper emerging from that project will be published by AOS’s The Condor this week. Photo by @the.jade.heron. #ornithology #wildlife #birds #owls #science #scientist #stem
    Follow us on Instagram