AOS shares society news and promotes ornithology in general and the activities of our members in particular through our Twitter (@AmOrnith), Facebook (AmOrnith), and Instagram (@AmOrnith) accounts.

AOS may share published research and other publicly available items via our social media platforms without seeking consent from the authors. AOS members wishing to have specific work of theirs promoted via AOS social media platforms should contact AOS at info@americanornithology.org.

AOS Meetings

Research presented at AOS conferences maybe shared via social media by employees of AOS or conference attendees unless the presenter(s) specifically requests otherwise. Photos of slides and materials at conferences can be used in any social media platform unless the presenter has opted out by placing a “no social media” icon (an example can be found below) on their PowerPoint slides or materials. It is up to individual speakers and presenters to alert people about what they do not want posted, whether it is content, pictures, or something else. We ask that conference attendees respect individuals’ wishes to help protect the privacy of both people and their research. Preventing conference attendees from commenting or live tweeting, however, is extremely difficult and not a role or responsibility of AOS.  

To help audiences during conferences, we recommend that presenters include their personal or project social media handle on every slide to encourage sharing and allow for easier networking. For those without a personal or project social media handle, consider including the conference hashtag or a social media icon such as the Twitter icon to let people know that you are supportive of others posting.

Social Media Opt-Out symbol (Twitter example):

icon to indicate no social media sharing

AOS Commenting Policy

Anyone may participate in conversations on AOS’s social media platforms, blog post comments, etc. In order to encourage civil communication, the following policy applies to all postings on AOS communication platforms.

AOS reserves the right to delete posts or comments containing spam, irrelevant remarks, or items that do not align with the mission and integrity of AOS. Personal attacks, promotion of violence, promotion of illegal activities, offensive material, or profanity will not be tolerated and will be deleted immediately. AOS reserves the right to ban users who violate this policy. 

AOS encourages our members to participate on our social media platforms, and the goal of this policy is to facilitate a lively and respectful conversation about science, professional development, and ornithology.

Anyone may participate in the conversations on AOS’s social media channels. In order to encourage civil communication, the following policy applies to all postings on AOS’s social media channels.

AOS reserves the right to delete posts or comments containing spam, irrelevant remarks, or items that do not align with the mission and integrity of the AOS. Personal attacks, promotion of violence, promotion of illegal activities, offensive material, or profanity will not be tolerated and will be deleted immediately. AOS reserves the right to ban users who violate this policy.

AOS encourages our members to participate on our social media channels and we hope these rules will facilitate a lively and respectful conversation about birds and ornithology.

From the field

Plenty of studies, especially in “birdy” places like shade-grown coffee farms, have shown that birds can provide an economically valuable service to farmers by eating pest insects. But what about in the huge swathes of farmland that cover much of the U.S.? To find out, the researchers behind a recent study in The Condor set up mesh “exclosures” over corn and soybean plants to see how keeping out birds but not insects would affect crops' success. They found that birds had a positive effect on corn crop yield, but a negative effect on soybean crop yield in the adjacent field. For the many farmers that use a corn-corn-soybean rotation schedule, this may suggest economic gain in the long run. Learn more at the blog post linked in our profile! Photos by Daryl Coldren and Megan Garfinkel. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #ecology #conservation #science #agriculture #midwestThe sunbirds are a group of nectar-eating songbirds from Africa and Asia that are a sort of Old World counterpart of hummingbirds. A recent paper in The Condor offered a new reason to prioritize sunbird conservation beyond just At Michigan State I teach two courses, Ecology and Tropical Biology. Each fall during the Tropical Biology course we have a “Tropical Thanksgiving.” Each group of students is assigned a plant family with a distribution primarily in the tropics, and students need to uncover a species in the plant family that humans eat. Then they bring in a dish prepared with that species, like pineapple upside down cake, brownies, or banana cream pie. Our Tropical Thanksgivings tend to be heavy on desserts! #ecology #tropicalecology #tropicalbiology #ethnobotany #botany #plantbiology #thanksgiving
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[Thanks, Catherine! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]We have worked in Panama and Costa Rica in areas undergoing forest restoration. Birds play vital roles in restoration systems by consuming insects that can damage young trees. They also disperse seeds of plants and provide pollination services. Tropical birds are also just cool! Photo credits include Sean Williams. #ornithology #wildlife #science #birds #ecology #conservation #restoration #neotropicalbirds
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[Our thanks to Catherine Lindell, Editor-in-Chief of AOS journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications, who's taking over this account for the week!]We have investigated a number of tactics to deter pest birds in orchards. Inflatable tube-men appear effective in some contexts, if farmers move them around and use enough of them. We have had mixed results with drones; some models and some flight trajectories are likely to be more effective than others in deterring crop-eating birds. Photo credits include Shayna Wiefrich and Ben Hawes. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #agriculture #orchards #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to Catherine Lindell, Editor-in-Chief of AOS journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications, who's taking over this account for the week!]We recently investigated the roles American Kestrels can play in pest management in fruit-production systems. Working with famers in Michigan, we built and installed kestrel nest boxes in sweet cherry orchards. While kestrels nest in the boxes, they provision their young with arthropods, mammals, and birds that consume the cherries. Kestrels also reduce fruit-eating bird activity in the orchards with their presence. Photo credits include Amanda LaFay and Craig Sklarczyk. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #raptors #kestrels #orchards #ecology #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to Catherine Lindell, Editor-in-Chief of AOS journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications, who's taking over this account for the week!]Hi, I’m Catherine Lindell, #AOSMember and Editor-in-Chief of AOS journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications! I'll be taking over the AOS Instagram account this week. I’m an associate professor at Michigan State University in the Integrative Biology Department and the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations. My students and I investigate the roles birds play in managed ecosystems like agroecosystems and areas undergoing restoration. Photos by Sean Williams and Steve Roels. #ornithology #science #ecology #birds #restoration #biology #womeninstem
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