corridor lined with files

Archives relevant to the history of ornithology comprise the personal field notes, correspondence, photographs and manuscripts of ornithologists, as well as specimen collections (largely housed in museums), and the correspondence and official documents of ornithological societies and clubs. The list below summarizes the contents of some ornithological archives and provides links to them or to the relevant contact person.

AOU archives: The archives of the American Ornithologists’ Union from 1883-2015 are housed at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC. The link will take you to the searchable database at the Smithsonian site.

COS archives: The archives of the Cooper Ornithological Society from 1874-1967 are housed at the following four locations.

Archives related to individual people:

Additional archives:

    From the field

    In 2017, Clark Rushing (Utah State University), Viviana Ruiz-Gutierrez (Cornell Lab of Ornithology), and I began studying migratory connectivity and demography of the declining eastern population of Painted Buntings, using light-level geolocators to track their movements (first photo). This population breeds in coastal woodland and Piedmont scrub in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (second photo). Our preliminary results indicate that these birds winter in Florida, the Bahamas, and Cuba. Painted Buntings really like white millet seed (third photo), and Andrew Sharp, a master's degree student at Utah State University, has developed feeders with RFID readers to record spatial encounter data for Painted Buntings on their breeding grounds (fourth photo). Photos by Viviana Ruiz-Gutierrez. #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #ecology #conservation
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[Our thanks to AOS member Scott Sillett, Editor-in-Chief of The Auk: Ornithological Advances, who's taking over this account for the week!]Whoops, looks like we left off the video clip that was supposed to be in today's earlier post about the birds of the Channel Islands! Here it is. Female corvids give distinctive rattle-calls that are used to communicate aggression to other females and in pair interactions with males, and Island Scrub-Jay rattle-calls are subtly different between oak and pine habitats. Video by Christopher Tarango. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #conservation #ecology #animals #channelislands #californiaSince 2003, I've worked with a great group of colleagues and graduate students to study birds on the California Channel Islands. We've investigated the behavior, breeding ecology, demography, genetic structure, and local adaptation of endemic populations of Orange-crowned Warbler and Song Sparrow and of the archipelago's only endemic bird species, the Island Scrub-Jay. The blue-labelled islands on this map [1st image, Brian Cohen] make up Channel Islands National Park. Unlike its mainland conspecifics, the subspecies of Orange-crowned Warbler on the Channel Islands has remarkable plasticity in nest-site selection. Some nest in trees and shrubs [2nd image, Susana Peluc]; others, particularly when they perceive a risk of nest predation, nest on the ground like all mainland subspecies [3rd image, Susana Peluc]. Song Sparrows on San Miguel Island have relatively small bills, like the extinct population from Santa Barbara Island. Small bills appear to be an adaptation to relatively cool climates [4th image]. Finally, Island Scrub-Jays are currently restricted to Santa Cruz Island and have a total population size of 1700 - 2300, making them one of the rarest and most range-restricted bird species in North America. They are the primary long-distance disperser of acorns on Santa Cruz Island and have been central to the recovery of oak habitats after 150 years of livestock grazing [5th image, Colin Woolley]. Female corvids give distinctive rattle-calls that are used to communicate aggression to other females and in pair interactions with males, and Island Scrub-Jay rattle-calls are subtly different between oak and pine habitats [NOTE: looks like accidentally left out the video clip, see follow-up post!]. #ornithology #birds #warblers #wildlife #science #conservation #ecology #animals #channelislands #california
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[Our thanks to AOS member Scott Sillett, Editor-in-Chief of The Auk: Ornithological Advances, who's taking over this account for the week!]I’m part of a research team studying Black-throated Blue Warblers (BTBW) and other migratory songbirds at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. My former Ph.D. advisor, Dick Holmes, started bird research at Hubbard Brook in 1969. The BTBW project began in 1982, making this one of the longest-running songbird population studies in the U.S. Our current research focuses on understanding how BTBW respond to lengthening growing or “greenHi folks! I’m Scott Sillett, Editor-in-Chief of The Auk: Ornithological Advances and a Research Wildlife Biologist at the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, part of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Washington, DC. I study the population biology of migratory and resident birds. Stay tuned this week to learn about my research projects and about being a journal editor with the American Ornithological Society! #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #conservationDo you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current Elective Councilor Lauryn Benedict has to say about her experience so far. Nominations are due November 29!Climate change means spring is arriving earlier in the Arctic, but not all Arctic-breeding geese are affected the same way — some (such as the Barnacle Goose pictured here) successfully produce more offspring in years with earlier springs, but some produce fewer. New research published in The Auk suggests that this is because timing of spring has different effects on two different stages of the breeding cycle: the pre-laying, laying, and nesting phase, and the hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile phase. When snow melts earlier, more geese initiate a nest, their clutch size is larger, and the chance that the eggs will hatch increases. However, the second stage (hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile) is negatively affected by earlier springs, because food quality is already declining by the time the eggs hatch, creating a trophic mismatch. Photo by Michiel Boom. #ornithology #science #nature #wildlife #birds #geese #conservation #ecology #climatechange #arctic
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