Please note: Because AOS’s 2020 meeting is part of the North American Ornithological Conference, hosted jointly with several other societies, student and postdoc travel awards for 2020 are being handled through the NAOC website.

AOS provides travel awards for students (undergraduate, masters, and doctoral) as well as postdocs to help defray expenses to attend our annual meeting. These awards, made possible by endowed funds established through the generosity of Marcia Brady Tucker (in 1978) and Brina Kessel (in 2017), are administered by the Student & Postdoc Travel and Presentation Awards Committee.

To be eligible for an award, a student must present an oral or poster presentation and must be the sole author or presenting author on co-authored presentations. Student applicants need not be members when they apply; however, awardees must be AOS members in order to receive their awards. Post-doc applicants must be a members of AOS when they apply and be generally ineligible for institutional student travel awards (e.g., graduated more than a semester prior to the meeting). Students between degree-seeking programs who intend to re-enter a degree program in the future may also apply for these awards.

Travel Awards In Support of Diversity & Inclusion

As part of our ongoing efforts to foster a diverse and inclusive community, AOS is proud offer additional travel awards supporting individuals from underrepresented groups and/or those who have made significant contributions towards fostering a diverse and inclusive community. Membership in AOS is not required to be eligible for these awards. Students and post-docs (as described above) that wish to be considered for these awards should select the appropriate option in the application process. 

Applicants for travel awards under the auspices of diversity and inclusion may also apply for the general travel awards; however, to receive a regular travel award you mush be a student member of AOS as described above. Awardees will not be able to receive funding for both.

Application Details

Individuals wishing to be considered for travel awards must indicate their interest when submitting their abstract for the meeting. The online abstract submission form includes a set of questions specific to those seeking a travel award. Answering these questions, in addition to completing the rest of the abstract submission form, will serve as the individual’s travel award application.

Required application materials include the following:

  • Current academic standing (e.g. undergrad, MS, PhD, post-doc, between degrees).
  • Supervisor’s name and email address.
  • Anticipated graduation date.
  • Travel budget information. Note: Budget requests can only include estimated costs associated with travel to and from the annual meeting. Eligible expenses are limited to airfare, shuttles/taxis/Uber, gas, etc. Other costs such as lodging and meeting registration cannot be included in the budget request. 
  • Location from which you will be traveling (state/province and country).
  • Past travel and/or presentation awards you have received from AOS.
  • A signed letter from your current advisor on university letterhead indicating you are a student in good academic standing, or (if you are between degree-seeking programs) a signed letter from your previous advisor, indicating that you intend to re-enter a degree program in the future.

    From the field

    Hi everyone, I’m Connor Wood (@cmmwood), a PhD student at @uwmadison and AOS member, and I’ll be taking over AOS’s account this week! I use bioacoustics to study Spotted Owls and Barred Owls in California’s Sierra Nevada. Recent advances in bioacoustic hardware and software have opened up exciting new research possibilities in the last few years. I’ll be sharing some photos from my dissertation research, which was the first landscape-scale multi-species owl surveys in the U.S. One paper emerging from that project will be published by AOS’s The Condor this week. Photo by @the.jade.heron. #ornithology #wildlife #birds #owls #science #scientist #stemAs a member of the AOS Council, I am happy to play a role in helping to steer the society forward and also make our conferences a great experience for all! I am particularly keen to make AOS a society that fosters the development of early career ornithologists — they are the ones who will be doing the important work of the future. Thank you for following along this week! Photo by Todd Forsgren. #ornithology #science #stem
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[Thanks to Mike Webster for taking over the account this week! Mike had so much fun putting this together that he decided to create his own Instagram account — you can follow him at @michaelwebster83. If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch!]As Director of the Macaulay Library, I am excited to provide the resources and training that will help ornithologists do the research that helps us understand and conserve birds. This is a shot of me with a few of the students that participated in a bioacoustics recordings and analysis workshop that we ran in India this past year. Calling all researchers: the Macaulay Library has audio recordings, videos, and photos of more than 85% of the world’s birds available for your research project! Photo by Mike Webster. #ornithology #science #wildlife #stem #india
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[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]New Hampshire and Colorado aside, much of my research career has involved tropical birds, starting with my dissertation research (many years ago!) on the breeding system of the Montezuma Oropendola. Photo Credit: Annette Teng/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML83646041). #birds #wildlife #ornithology #science #tropicalbirds
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[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]I grew up in Colorado, where I developed my fascination (and passion) for the outdoors and animal behavior, particular the behavior of wild birds. My first research experience came as a field tech studying the lekking behavior of Greater Sage Grouse in the Sierra Mountains. First photo, Linda Sterk; second photo, Andrew Spencer/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML27679151). #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #colorado #biology #ecology #birdbehavior
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[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]Another major area of research in my lab is on the effects of climate change on breeding of migratory birds, such as the Black-throated Blue Warbler. Our work with this bird in New Hampshire's White Mountains has revealed that behavioral plasticity allows these birds to deal flexibly with advancing springs, but only up to a point! First photo, Ian Davies/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML31729651); second photo, Rebecca Koch; third and fourth photos, Linda Sterk. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #biology #ecology #warblers #conservation #climatechange
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[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]Much of my research focuses on the evolution of communication signals, like plumage coloration and song, in Australian birds. Currently much of my work focuses on the Red-backed Fairywren of northern Australia. I am fascinated by fairywrens because they live in complex, cooperative family groups, and yet show high levels of extrapair mating (that is,
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