AOS provides travel awards for students (undergraduate, masters, and doctoral) as well as postdocs to help defray expenses to attend our annual meeting. These awards are administered by the Student & Postdoc Travel and Presentation Awards Committee.

To be eligible for an award, a student must present an oral or poster presentation and must be the sole author or presenting author on co-authored presentations. Student applicants need not be members when they apply; however, awardees must be AOS members in order to receive their awards. Post-doc applicants must be a members of AOS when they apply and be generally ineligible for institutional student travel awards (e.g., graduated more than a semester prior to the meeting). Students between degree-seeking programs who intend to re-enter a degree program in the future may also apply for these awards.

Travel Awards In Support of Diversity & Inclusion

As part of our ongoing efforts to foster a diverse and inclusive community, AOS is proud offer additional travel awards supporting individuals from underrepresented groups and/or those who have made significant contributions towards fostering a diverse and inclusive community. Membership in AOS is not required to be eligible for these awards. Students and post-docs (as described above) that wish to be considered for these awards should select the appropriate option in the application process. 

Applicants for travel awards under the auspices of diversity and inclusion may also apply for the general travel awards; however, to receive a regular travel award you mush be a student member of AOS as described above. Awardees will not be able to receive funding for both.

Application Details

Individuals wishing to be considered for travel awards must indicate their interest when submitting their abstract for the meeting. The online abstract submission form includes a set of questions specific to those seeking a travel award. Answering these questions, in addition to completing the rest of the abstract submission form, will serve as the individual’s travel award application.

Required application materials include the following:

  • Current academic standing (e.g. undergrad, MS, PhD, post-doc, between degrees).
  • Supervisor’s name and email address.
  • Anticipated graduation date.
  • Travel budget information. Note: Budget requests can only include estimated costs associated with travel to and from the annual meeting. Eligible expenses are limited to airfare, shuttles/taxis/Uber, gas, etc. Other costs such as lodging and meeting registration cannot be included in the budget request. 
  • Location from which you will be traveling (state/province and country).
  • Past travel and/or presentation awards you have received from AOS.
  • A signed letter from your current advisor on university letterhead indicating you are a student in good academic standing, or (if you are between degree-seeking programs) a signed letter from your previous advisor, indicating that you intend to re-enter a degree program in the future.

    From the field

    Hummingbird hybrids? Yes! This photos is of an Allen's Hummingbird x Rufous Hummingbird hybrid, captured near Happy Camp, California. Researchers recently identified a previously unknown hybrid zone where the two species overlap in northern California and southern Oregon, and their findings were published this week in The Auk: Ornithological Advances. Scientists hope that studying hybridization between the two species could yield new insights about how biodiversity is created and maintained. Read the press release at the link in our profile! Photo by Brian Myers. #ornithology #wildlife #science #birds #conservation #hummingbirds #nature #animalsWhy are mallards sometimes called the Research recently published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows that these two spectacular, closely related hummingbird species occupying the same habitat in the Andes — the Blue-throated Starfrontlet (Coeligena helianthea) and the Golden-bellied Starfrontlet (C. bonapartei) — may be an example of speciation with gene flow, where one species splits into two despite ongoing interbreeding between the two diverging groups. #ornithology #science #wildlife #birds #hummingbirds #nature #animalsI also use small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS, aka drones) in my work in conservation as well as in work for the electric industry unrelated to conservation. Drones can cause much less disturbance than traditional methods when checking the nests of raptors. Drones can also be used to install line markers to reduce avian collisions, to inspect nests for entanglement hazards, or to quantify wildlife. I even get to fly drones in high voltage environments where a person would be killed if they entered! It's been fun taking over the AOS Instagram account this week — if you have questions about my work, you can reach me at jdwyer@edmlink.com! #birds #ornithology #science #conservation #wildlife #drones #powerlines
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A big thank you to #AOSMember James Dwyer for his posts this week! If you're an AOS member and would like to be featured here, please send us a message.The Avian Collision Avoidance System (ACAS), which I posted about earlier this week, is just one way of addressing avian collisions with power lines. Other methods involve “line marking,” which uses attachments on wires to increase line visibility. Unfortunately, these methods are not as reliable as we would like. In the attached photos, a Green-winged Teal in Colorado, a sparrow in Colorado, a sparrow in Wyoming, a warbler in California, and a Ring-billed Gull in California illustrate the range of species and habitats where collisions occur. #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #conservation #powerlines
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[Thank you to #AOSMember James Dwyer, who's taking over our account this week — keep following along!]Avian electrocutions can be prevented. Electrocutions can cause power outages, damage expensive equipment, start wildfires, and violate state and federal conservation laws. I tend to emphasize the first three concerns when working with utilities because unplanned outages, equipment replacement, and wildfire controls or restitution can be used in sound business cases for investing in avian electrocution mitigation regardless of the political climate. In the attached photos, an electrocuted Black-billed Magpie in Idaho (burned feet), Common Raven in California (burned beak), Bald Eagle in Colorado (burned neck and back), and Great Horned Owl in Arizona (burned wing) illustrate the range of species and habitats where electrocutions occur. All photos by me. #ornithology #birds #conservation #science #wildlife
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[Thank you to #AOSMember James Dwyer, who's taking over our account this week — keep following along!]I’ve had great opportunities to work in avian conservation internationally in Africa, Canada, the Dominican Republic, the Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Hungary, and Spain. In these photos, a Griffon Vulture in South Africa feeds in front of a power line (out of image frame) where numerous vultures have been electrocuted, a Ridgeway’s Hawk in the Dominican Republic jumps through the air gap around a power line to land on a conductor cover installed to prevent avian electrocutions, and an electrocuted Common Buzzard and Griffon Vulture can be seen on pylons. All photos by me. #ornithology #birds #science #conservation #wildlife #raptors #birdsofprey #powerlines
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[Thank you to #AOSMember James Dwyer, who's taking over our account this week — keep following along!]
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