AOS provides travel awards for students (undergraduate, masters, and doctoral) as well as postdocs to help defray expenses to attend our annual meeting. These awards are administered by the Student & Postdoc Travel and Presentation Awards Committee.

To be eligible for an award, a student must present an oral or poster presentation and must be the sole author or presenting author on co-authored presentations. Student applicants need not be members when they apply; however, awardees must be AOS members in order to receive their awards. Post-doc applicants must be a members of AOS when they apply and be generally ineligible for institutional student travel awards (e.g., graduated more than a semester prior to the meeting). Students between degree-seeking programs who intend to re-enter a degree program in the future may also apply for these awards.

Travel Awards In Support of Diversity & Inclusion

As part of our ongoing efforts to foster a diverse and inclusive community, AOS is proud offer additional travel awards supporting individuals from underrepresented groups and/or those who have made significant contributions towards fostering a diverse and inclusive community. Membership in AOS is not required to be eligible for these awards. Students and post-docs (as described above) that wish to be considered for these awards should select the appropriate option in the application process. 

Applicants for travel awards under the auspices of diversity and inclusion may also apply for the general travel awards; however, to receive a regular travel award you mush be a student member of AOS as described above. Awardees will not be able to receive funding for both.

Application Details

Individuals wishing to be considered for travel awards must indicate their interest when submitting their abstract for the meeting. The online abstract submission form includes a set of questions specific to those seeking a travel award. Answering these questions, in addition to completing the rest of the abstract submission form, will serve as the individual’s travel award application.

Required application materials include the following:

  • Current academic standing (e.g. undergrad, MS, PhD, post-doc, between degrees).
  • Supervisor’s name and email address.
  • Anticipated graduation date.
  • Travel budget information. Note: Budget requests can only include estimated costs associated with travel to and from the annual meeting. Eligible expenses are limited to airfare, shuttles/taxis/Uber, gas, etc. Other costs such as lodging and meeting registration cannot be included in the budget request. 
  • Location from which you will be traveling (state/province and country).
  • Past travel and/or presentation awards you have received from AOS.
  • A signed letter from your current advisor on university letterhead indicating you are a student in good academic standing, or (if you are between degree-seeking programs) a signed letter from your previous advisor, indicating that you intend to re-enter a degree program in the future.

    From the field

    Do you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current Elective Councilor Lauryn Benedict has to say about her experience so far. Nominations are due November 29, and you can find more details at the link in our profile!Climate change means spring is arriving earlier in the Arctic, but not all Arctic-breeding geese are affected the same way — some (such as the Barnacle Goose pictured here) successfully produce more offspring in years with earlier springs, but some produce fewer. New research published in The Auk suggests that this is because timing of spring has different effects on two different stages of the breeding cycle: the pre-laying, laying, and nesting phase, and the hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile phase. When snow melts earlier, more geese initiate a nest, their clutch size is larger, and the chance that the eggs will hatch increases. However, the second stage (hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile) is negatively affected by earlier springs, because food quality is already declining by the time the eggs hatch, creating a trophic mismatch. Photo by Michiel Boom. #ornithology #science #nature #wildlife #birds #geese #conservation #ecology #climatechange #arcticDo you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current President-Elect Tom Sherry has to say about his experience so far. Nominations are due November 29!Thanks for letting me take over the AOS Instagram for a week! I hope I’ve given a good glimpse into my research and experiences. For all of the undergraduate ornithologists out there, I encourage you to strive for new horizons in your research! I plan on beginning a Master’s or PhD program in the fall of 2020 to continue my studies in ornithology. My future research interests include studying the genomic, behavioral, spatial, and morphological effects of hybridization and the formation of hybrid zones. #ornithology #science #wildlife #biology #birds #dogsofinstagram #womeninstem
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[Thanks, Angelica! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]As a lover of the outdoors, I find myself looking for new experiences wherever I can. In the summer of 2018, I took part in a study-abroad intensive led by Dr. McRae and Dr. Kyle Summers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. I engaged in daily and nightly hikes through Pipeline Road and Barro Colorado Island and conversed with the resident scientists about their current studies and long-term research goals on Barro Colorado Island. My experiences in the rainforest encouraged me to pursue work in wildlife biology and conservation. #science #conservation #biology #wildlife #ecology #panama #womeninstem #ornithology
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]I began conducting field research in 2017. Since then, I’ve developed valuable skills and knowledge needed for working safely and effectively in the field, both with others and on my own. I’ve found that I’m never quite finished learning from the people and birds that I work with! Both photos belong to Dr. Susan B. McRae. #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #bluebirds #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]As an undergraduate research assistant, I conduct routine nest checks of bluebird boxes. I enjoy watching the parents build nests through my binoculars! My thesis work investigates factors that affect nest size variation in a specific population of Eastern Bluebirds. I’ve found that the weights of the nests they build are positively correlated to mean daily maximum temperatures within boxes during the incubation period. I gave a poster presentation of my senior thesis work at the 2019 conference in Anchorage last summer! #AOSMember #ornithology #science #birds #wildlife #bluebirds #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]
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