Please note: Because AOS’s 2020 meeting is part of the North American Ornithological Conference, hosted jointly with several other societies, student presentation awards for 2020 are being handled through the NAOC website.

Each year, AOS confers several prestigious Student Presentation Awards to students (undergraduate, masters, and doctoral) who present an outstanding poster or oral paper at the society’s annual meeting. Each award consists of a $500 honorarium. These awards are administered by the Student & Postdoc Travel and Presentation Awards Committee.

Individuals wishing to be considered for a Student Presentation Award must indicate their interest when submitting their abstract for the general scientific sessions. The online abstract submission form includes an option to indicate interest in being considered for a student presentation award, and answering this question, in addition to completing the rest of the abstract submission form, will serve as the individual’s application to the Student Presentation Award competition.

The Awards

The AOS Student Presentation Awards include the following:

  • The Nellie Johnson Baroody Award, given for the best presentation on any topic in ornithology.
  • The Robert B. Berry Student Award, given for the best oral presentation on a topic pertaining to avian conservation.
  • The Mark E. Hauber Award, given for the best oral presentation on avian behavior.
  • The A. Brazier Howell Award, given for the best presentation on any topic in ornithology.
  • The Frances F. Roberts Award, given for the best presentation on any topic in ornithology.
  • The AOS Council Awards, given for the best presentations on any topic in ornithology.

Student Presentation Award Eligibility

To participate in the presentation award competition, a student must be:

  • A current member of AOS.
  • The sole presenting author of a poster or oral paper presentation. Students giving 15-minute talks as part of a symposium are eligible, but those giving longer talks in a symposium are not eligible.
  • A full-time or recently graduated student (including undergraduates). Students graduating the semester prior to the meeting are also eligible for presentation awards.

Awards are made based on the quality of research and presentation. Preference is given to students in the final phases of completing their research, as opposed to those presenting preliminary findings. Students may receive only one presentation award from AOS in their lifetime.

    From the field

    Hi everyone, I’m Connor Wood (@cmmwood), a PhD student at @uwmadison and AOS member, and I’ll be taking over AOS’s account this week! I use bioacoustics to study Spotted Owls and Barred Owls in California’s Sierra Nevada. Recent advances in bioacoustic hardware and software have opened up exciting new research possibilities in the last few years. I’ll be sharing some photos from my dissertation research, which was the first landscape-scale multi-species owl surveys in the U.S. One paper emerging from that project will be published by AOS’s The Condor this week. Photo by @the.jade.heron. #ornithology #wildlife #birds #owls #science #scientist #stemAs a member of the AOS Council, I am happy to play a role in helping to steer the society forward and also make our conferences a great experience for all! I am particularly keen to make AOS a society that fosters the development of early career ornithologists — they are the ones who will be doing the important work of the future. Thank you for following along this week! Photo by Todd Forsgren. #ornithology #science #stem
.
[Thanks to Mike Webster for taking over the account this week! Mike had so much fun putting this together that he decided to create his own Instagram account — you can follow him at @michaelwebster83. If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch!]As Director of the Macaulay Library, I am excited to provide the resources and training that will help ornithologists do the research that helps us understand and conserve birds. This is a shot of me with a few of the students that participated in a bioacoustics recordings and analysis workshop that we ran in India this past year. Calling all researchers: the Macaulay Library has audio recordings, videos, and photos of more than 85% of the world’s birds available for your research project! Photo by Mike Webster. #ornithology #science #wildlife #stem #india
.
[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]New Hampshire and Colorado aside, much of my research career has involved tropical birds, starting with my dissertation research (many years ago!) on the breeding system of the Montezuma Oropendola. Photo Credit: Annette Teng/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML83646041). #birds #wildlife #ornithology #science #tropicalbirds
.
[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]I grew up in Colorado, where I developed my fascination (and passion) for the outdoors and animal behavior, particular the behavior of wild birds. My first research experience came as a field tech studying the lekking behavior of Greater Sage Grouse in the Sierra Mountains. First photo, Linda Sterk; second photo, Andrew Spencer/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML27679151). #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #colorado #biology #ecology #birdbehavior
.
[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]Another major area of research in my lab is on the effects of climate change on breeding of migratory birds, such as the Black-throated Blue Warbler. Our work with this bird in New Hampshire's White Mountains has revealed that behavioral plasticity allows these birds to deal flexibly with advancing springs, but only up to a point! First photo, Ian Davies/Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML31729651); second photo, Rebecca Koch; third and fourth photos, Linda Sterk. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #biology #ecology #warblers #conservation #climatechange
.
[Our thanks to AOS member Mike Webster, who's taking over this account for the week!]Much of my research focuses on the evolution of communication signals, like plumage coloration and song, in Australian birds. Currently much of my work focuses on the Red-backed Fairywren of northern Australia. I am fascinated by fairywrens because they live in complex, cooperative family groups, and yet show high levels of extrapair mating (that is,
    Follow us on Instagram