Please note: Because the 2020 AOS meeting is part of the North American Ornithological Conference, hosted jointly with several other societies, student presentation awards for 2020 are being handled through the NAOC website.

Each year, AOS confers several prestigious Student Presentation Awards to students (undergraduate, masters, and doctoral) who present an outstanding poster or oral paper at the society’s annual meeting. Each award consists of a $500 honorarium. These awards are administered by the Student & Postdoc Travel and Presentation Awards Committee.

Individuals wishing to be considered for a Student Presentation Award must indicate their interest when submitting their abstract for the general scientific sessions. The online abstract submission form includes an option to indicate interest in being considered for a student presentation award, and answering this question, in addition to completing the rest of the abstract submission form, will serve as the individual’s application to the Student Presentation Award competition.

The Awards

The AOS Student Presentation Awards include the following:

  • The Nellie Johnson Baroody Award, given for the best presentation on any topic in ornithology.
  • The Robert B. Berry Student Award, given for the best oral presentation on a topic pertaining to avian conservation.
  • The Mark E. Hauber Award, given for the best oral presentation on avian behavior.
  • The A. Brazier Howell Award, given for the best presentation on any topic in ornithology.
  • The Frances F. Roberts Award, given for the best presentation on any topic in ornithology.
  • The AOS Council Awards, given for the best presentations on any topic in ornithology.

Eligibility for Student Presentation Awards

To participate in the presentation award competition, a student must be:

  • A current member of AOS.
  • The sole presenting author of a poster or oral paper presentation. Students giving 15-minute talks as part of a symposium are eligible, but those giving longer talks in a symposium are not eligible.
  • A full-time or recently graduated student (including undergraduates). Students graduating the semester prior to the meeting are also eligible for presentation awards.

Awards are made based on the quality of research and presentation. Preference is given to students in the final phases of completing their research, as opposed to those presenting preliminary findings. Students may receive only one presentation award from AOS in their lifetime.

From the field

Congratulations to all of the recipients of this year's AOS awards! Our annual awards honor members for their research and volunteer work. The work of the 2020 awardees spans a diversity of ornithological disciplines from genetics to landscape ecology in a range of habitats around the world, as well as invaluable service to AOS and ornithology. This year’s slate of awardees represents just a small sample of the broad diversity of our members and the contributions they are making to the scientific study and conservation of birds. Learn more about all of them at the link in our profile! #ornithology #science #biologyThe charismatic Euphonia and Chlorophonia finches are small, colorful birds that inhabit forests and woodlands from Mexico to Brazil as well as much of the Caribbean, and how exactly they fit into the songbird family tree has been debated for 20 years. The researchers behind a paper recently published in The Auk used tissue specimens and study skins from every species in this group to generate 40 *billion* base pairs of sequence data, including nearly 5,000 loci from the nuclear genome and near-complete mitochondrial genomes for every species. This amazing dataset shows has helped resolve their relationships once and for all. It also suggests that this group likely dispersed from South America into the Caribbean and North America multiple times between 2 and 4 million years ago, lending support to a younger geological timeframe for the formation of the Isthmus of Panama than argued by some other recent studies. Photos by Daniel J. Field (University of Cambridge) and Tyler Imfeld. #ornithology #science #birds #wildlife #neotropicalbirds #taxonomy #biology #finchesOne final #NationalVolunteerWeek post! Meet Rebecca Kimball, longtime AOS volunteer and Treasurer of the society since 2015, one of the leaders helping shape AOS's future. We hope you've enjoyed celebrating Volunteer Week with us!Today for #NationalVolunteerWeek we're featuring Brian Peer, who's given his time to chair the AOS Research Awards Committee for the past eight years, leading the group that evaluates applications for Student Research Awards. Thank you, Brian!AOS is celebrating #NationalVolunteerWeek! Today, meet Kyle Horton, who volunteered his time to judge student presentations at last summer's AOS meeting in Anchorage, Alaska.Today for #NationalVolunteerWeek, meet Lori Hargrove! Lori works at the San Diego Natural History Museum and is a regular reviewer for AOS journal The Condor. Scholarly journals can't function without reviewers like Lori, who volunteer their time to read and assess the papers that are submitted.We're celebrating #NationalVolunteerWeek! AOS couldn't function without the many members who volunteer their time to assist with our meetings, publications, awards, and other programs, and we'll be introducing you to one of those volunteers every day this week. Today, meet Juita Martinez, a PhD student who helped staff the registration desk at last year's annual AOS meeting in Anchorage, Alaska!
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