wesley lanyon, aos award namesake

AOS’s Lanyon Award recognizes the early-career ornithologist who authors the best synthesis/review paper on avian science, to be published as an open-access article in either AOS journal (The Auk or The Condor). It is given in honor Wesley “Bud” Lanyon, who served as the 37th President of the American Ornithologists’ Union. Bud was a steadfast and committed leader in the field of ornithology and a respected mentor of many generations of scientists. He was particularly keen to support researchers in the midst of writing their dissertations and those who had recently completed their PhDs. Because they possess a thorough understanding of the current literature, he recognized, they are poised to provide novel insights into classic areas of ornithology and to elucidate emerging fields of study.

The Lanyon Award consists of a $1,000 honorarium to the winner plus a $1,000 travel stipend and gratis registration to attend the AOS annual meeting, where the winner will organize a symposium on their winning review topic.

Lanyon Award Application Process & Eligibility Details

  • Eligible applicants include doctoral students or early professionals within or up to the end of their third year post-PhD. (An extra year of eligibility may be granted for parental leave.)
  • Proposed papers should fit the journals’ mission and scope and be novel contributions that advance ornithology, not simply a review of a body of literature. The prize will be awarded to the individual who proposed the winning paper and led the writing. Proposals with multiple authors must include a statement that the first author conceived of the study and did the majority of research and writing. An applicant may only submit one first-authored proposal per application cycle.
  • Interested applicants must first submit an abstract of their proposed paper (details below). The journal Editors-in-Chief together and the four Deputy Editors will review the submitted abstracts, and up to six entrants per year will be invited to submit full manuscripts to the appropriate journal within three months.
  • The EICs and Deputy Editors will select a winner from the final set of accepted papers. The winner will be notified in advance of the next AOS meeting so that the symposium can be planned. The winner will be announced to the public as soon as the winning paper is selected, and the award conferred at the AOS annual meeting in which the symposium occurs.
  • Note that the prize will not be awarded in a given year if no submitted papers are deemed suitable for publication.

2019 Call for Abstracts

The next abstract submission period will open 3 August 2020.

Tentative schedule for the inaugural competition:

  • 30 August 2019: Deadline for submitting Abstracts for consideration
  • Early October 2019: Invitations made to authors for full paper submissions
  • 31 December 2019: Full papers due
  • March 2020: Selection made, authors notified, winner announced
  • Summer 2020: Papers published (dependent on editorial schedule of the specific journal; target is to publish before meeting and symposium)
  • August 2020: Award presented at NAOC 2020 in Puerto Rico

From the field

Agricultural lands can support bird populations, but agricultural intensification can also cause populations to decline — so what role are changes in American agriculture playing for Mourning Doves? A Mourning Dove’s age can be estimated from the molt pattern of the wing feathers, and the age ratios of birds killed by hunters let the researchers behind a recent paper in The Condor estimate doves’ reproductive output in different regions. They found that although the specifics varied between locations, small changes in land cover were linked to large differences in Mourning Doves' reproductive output. In the eastern U.S., for example, counties with greater proportions of intensive corn and soybean agriculture had much lower ratios of juveniles to adults. Learn more at the press release linked in our profile! Photo by David Muñoz. #agriculture #ornithology #birds #wildlife #conservation #science #ecology #mourningdoveMillions of songbirds that breed across North America converge on a tiny region of Colombia called the Darién during their migration each year, as shown by research recently published in The Condor. This is what the researchers call a migratory Plenty of studies, especially in “birdy” places like shade-grown coffee farms, have shown that birds can provide an economically valuable service to farmers by eating pest insects. But what about in the huge swathes of farmland that cover much of the U.S.? To find out, the researchers behind a recent study in The Condor set up mesh “exclosures” over corn and soybean plants to see how keeping out birds but not insects would affect crops' success. They found that birds had a positive effect on corn crop yield, but a negative effect on soybean crop yield in the adjacent field. For the many farmers that use a corn-corn-soybean rotation schedule, this may suggest economic gain in the long run. Photos by Daryl Coldren and Megan Garfinkel. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #ecology #conservation #science #agriculture #midwestThe sunbirds are a group of nectar-eating songbirds from Africa and Asia that are a sort of Old World counterpart of hummingbirds. A recent paper in The Condor offered a new reason to prioritize sunbird conservation beyond just At Michigan State I teach two courses, Ecology and Tropical Biology. Each fall during the Tropical Biology course we have a “Tropical Thanksgiving.” Each group of students is assigned a plant family with a distribution primarily in the tropics, and students need to uncover a species in the plant family that humans eat. Then they bring in a dish prepared with that species, like pineapple upside down cake, brownies, or banana cream pie. Our Tropical Thanksgivings tend to be heavy on desserts! #ecology #tropicalecology #tropicalbiology #ethnobotany #botany #plantbiology #thanksgiving
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[Thanks, Catherine! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]We have worked in Panama and Costa Rica in areas undergoing forest restoration. Birds play vital roles in restoration systems by consuming insects that can damage young trees. They also disperse seeds of plants and provide pollination services. Tropical birds are also just cool! Photo credits include Sean Williams. #ornithology #wildlife #science #birds #ecology #conservation #restoration #neotropicalbirds
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[Our thanks to Catherine Lindell, Editor-in-Chief of AOS journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications, who's taking over this account for the week!]We have investigated a number of tactics to deter pest birds in orchards. Inflatable tube-men appear effective in some contexts, if farmers move them around and use enough of them. We have had mixed results with drones; some models and some flight trajectories are likely to be more effective than others in deterring crop-eating birds. Photo credits include Shayna Wiefrich and Ben Hawes. #ornithology #birds #wildlife #science #agriculture #orchards #womeninstem
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[Our thanks to Catherine Lindell, Editor-in-Chief of AOS journal The Condor: Ornithological Applications, who's taking over this account for the week!]
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