wesley lanyon, aos award namesake

AOS’s Lanyon Award recognizes the early-career ornithologist who authors the best synthesis/review paper on avian science, to be published as an open-access article in either AOS journal (The Auk or The Condor). It is given in honor Wesley “Bud” Lanyon, who served as the 37th President of the American Ornithologists’ Union. Bud was a steadfast and committed leader in the field of ornithology and a respected mentor of many generations of scientists. He was particularly keen to support researchers in the midst of writing their dissertations and those who had recently completed their PhDs. Because they possess a thorough understanding of the current literature, he recognized, they are poised to provide novel insights into classic areas of ornithology and to elucidate emerging fields of study.

The Lanyon Award consists of a $1,000 honorarium to the winner plus a $1,000 travel stipend and gratis registration to attend the AOS annual meeting, where the winner will organize a symposium on their winning review topic.

Lanyon Award Application Process & Eligibility Details

  • Eligible applicants include doctoral students or early professionals within or up to the end of their third year post-PhD. (An extra year of eligibility may be granted for parental leave.)
  • Proposed papers should fit the journals’ mission and scope and be novel contributions that advance ornithology, not simply a review of a body of literature. The prize will be awarded to the individual who proposed the winning paper and led the writing. Proposals with multiple authors must include a statement that the first author conceived of the study and did the majority of research and writing. An applicant may only submit one first-authored proposal per application cycle.
  • Interested applicants must first submit an abstract of their proposed paper (details below). The journal Editors-in-Chief together and the four Deputy Editors will review the submitted abstracts, and up to six entrants per year will be invited to submit full manuscripts to the appropriate journal within three months.
  • The EICs and Deputy Editors will select a winner from the final set of accepted papers. The winner will be notified in advance of the next AOS meeting so that the symposium can be planned. The winner will be announced to the public as soon as the winning paper is selected, and the award conferred at the AOS annual meeting in which the symposium occurs.
  • Note that the prize will not be awarded in a given year if no submitted papers are deemed suitable for publication.

2019 Call for Abstracts

The next abstract submission period will open 3 August 2020.

Tentative schedule for the inaugural competition:

  • 30 August 2019: Deadline for submitting Abstracts for consideration
  • Early October 2019: Invitations made to authors for full paper submissions
  • 31 December 2019: Full papers due
  • Spring 2020: Selection made, authors notified, winner announced
  • Summer 2020: Papers published (dependent on editorial schedule of the specific journal; target is to publish before meeting and symposium)
  • August 2020: Award presented at NAOC 2020 in Puerto Rico

From the field

Congratulations to all of the recipients of this year's AOS awards! Our annual awards honor members for their research and volunteer work. The work of the 2020 awardees spans a diversity of ornithological disciplines from genetics to landscape ecology in a range of habitats around the world, as well as invaluable service to AOS and ornithology. This year’s slate of awardees represents just a small sample of the broad diversity of our members and the contributions they are making to the scientific study and conservation of birds. Learn more about all of them at the link in our profile! #ornithology #science #biologyThe charismatic Euphonia and Chlorophonia finches are small, colorful birds that inhabit forests and woodlands from Mexico to Brazil as well as much of the Caribbean, and how exactly they fit into the songbird family tree has been debated for 20 years. The researchers behind a paper recently published in The Auk used tissue specimens and study skins from every species in this group to generate 40 *billion* base pairs of sequence data, including nearly 5,000 loci from the nuclear genome and near-complete mitochondrial genomes for every species. This amazing dataset shows has helped resolve their relationships once and for all. It also suggests that this group likely dispersed from South America into the Caribbean and North America multiple times between 2 and 4 million years ago, lending support to a younger geological timeframe for the formation of the Isthmus of Panama than argued by some other recent studies. Photos by Daniel J. Field (University of Cambridge) and Tyler Imfeld. #ornithology #science #birds #wildlife #neotropicalbirds #taxonomy #biology #finchesOne final #NationalVolunteerWeek post! Meet Rebecca Kimball, longtime AOS volunteer and Treasurer of the society since 2015, one of the leaders helping shape AOS's future. We hope you've enjoyed celebrating Volunteer Week with us!Today for #NationalVolunteerWeek we're featuring Brian Peer, who's given his time to chair the AOS Research Awards Committee for the past eight years, leading the group that evaluates applications for Student Research Awards. Thank you, Brian!AOS is celebrating #NationalVolunteerWeek! Today, meet Kyle Horton, who volunteered his time to judge student presentations at last summer's AOS meeting in Anchorage, Alaska.Today for #NationalVolunteerWeek, meet Lori Hargrove! Lori works at the San Diego Natural History Museum and is a regular reviewer for AOS journal The Condor. Scholarly journals can't function without reviewers like Lori, who volunteer their time to read and assess the papers that are submitted.We're celebrating #NationalVolunteerWeek! AOS couldn't function without the many members who volunteer their time to assist with our meetings, publications, awards, and other programs, and we'll be introducing you to one of those volunteers every day this week. Today, meet Juita Martinez, a PhD student who helped staff the registration desk at last year's annual AOS meeting in Anchorage, Alaska!
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