wesley lanyon, aos award namesake

AOS’s Lanyon Award recognizes the early-career ornithologist who authors the best synthesis/review paper on avian science, to be published as an open-access article in either AOS journal (The Auk or The Condor). It is given in honor Wesley “Bud” Lanyon, who served as the 37th President of the American Ornithologists’ Union. Bud was a steadfast and committed leader in the field of ornithology and a respected mentor of many generations of scientists. He was particularly keen to support researchers in the midst of writing their dissertations and those who had recently completed their PhDs. Because they possess a thorough understanding of the current literature, he recognized, they are poised to provide novel insights into classic areas of ornithology and to elucidate emerging fields of study.

The Lanyon Award consists of a $1,000 honorarium to the winner plus a $1,000 travel stipend and gratis registration to attend the AOS annual meeting, where the winner will organize a symposium on their winning review topic.

Lanyon Award Application Process & Eligibility Details

  • Eligible applicants include doctoral students or early professionals within or up to the end of their third year post-PhD. (An extra year of eligibility may be granted for parental leave.)
  • Proposed papers should fit the journals’ mission and scope and be novel contributions that advance ornithology, not simply a review of a body of literature. The prize will be awarded to the individual who proposed the winning paper and led the writing. Proposals with multiple authors must include a statement that the first author conceived of the study and did the majority of research and writing.
  • Interested applicants must first submit an abstract of their proposed paper (details below). The journal Editors-in-Chief together and the four Deputy Editors will review the submitted abstracts, and up to six entrants per year will be invited to submit full manuscripts to the appropriate journal within three months.
  • The EICs and Deputy Editors will select a winner from the final set of accepted papers. The winner will be notified in advance of the next AOS meeting so that the symposium can be planned. The winner will be announced to the public as soon as the winning paper is selected, and the award conferred at the AOS annual meeting in which the symposium occurs.
  • Note that the prize will not be awarded in a given year if no submitted papers are deemed suitable for publication.

2019 Call for Abstracts

Abstract submission is now closed. Invitations to entrants selected to submit full papers will be sent in early October.

Tentative schedule for the inaugural competition:

  • 30 August 2019: Deadline for submitting Abstracts for consideration
  • Early October 2019: Invitations made to authors for full paper submissions
  • 31 December 2019: Full papers due
  • March 2020: Selection made, authors notified, winner announced
  • Summer 2020: Papers published (dependent on editorial schedule of the specific journal; target is to publish before meeting and symposium)
  • August 2020: Award presented at NAOC 2020 in Puerto Rico

    From the field

    I’m part of a research team studying Black-throated Blue Warblers (BTBW) and other migratory songbirds at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. My former Ph.D. advisor, Dick Holmes, started bird research at Hubbard Brook in 1969. The BTBW project began in 1982, making this one of the longest-running songbird population studies in the U.S. Our current research focuses on understanding how BTBW respond to lengthening growing or “greenHi folks! I’m Scott Sillett, Editor-in-Chief of The Auk: Ornithological Advances and a Research Wildlife Biologist at the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center, part of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute in Washington, DC. I study the population biology of migratory and resident birds. Stay tuned this week to learn about my research projects and about being a journal editor with the American Ornithological Society! #ornithology #birds #science #wildlife #conservationDo you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current Elective Councilor Lauryn Benedict has to say about her experience so far. Nominations are due November 29!Climate change means spring is arriving earlier in the Arctic, but not all Arctic-breeding geese are affected the same way — some (such as the Barnacle Goose pictured here) successfully produce more offspring in years with earlier springs, but some produce fewer. New research published in The Auk suggests that this is because timing of spring has different effects on two different stages of the breeding cycle: the pre-laying, laying, and nesting phase, and the hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile phase. When snow melts earlier, more geese initiate a nest, their clutch size is larger, and the chance that the eggs will hatch increases. However, the second stage (hatchling, fledgling, and juvenile) is negatively affected by earlier springs, because food quality is already declining by the time the eggs hatch, creating a trophic mismatch. Photo by Michiel Boom. #ornithology #science #nature #wildlife #birds #geese #conservation #ecology #climatechange #arcticDo you want to help shape the future of AOS? Consider running for a spot on the AOS Council! Here's what current President-Elect Tom Sherry has to say about his experience so far. Nominations are due November 29!Thanks for letting me take over the AOS Instagram for a week! I hope I’ve given a good glimpse into my research and experiences. For all of the undergraduate ornithologists out there, I encourage you to strive for new horizons in your research! I plan on beginning a Master’s or PhD program in the fall of 2020 to continue my studies in ornithology. My future research interests include studying the genomic, behavioral, spatial, and morphological effects of hybridization and the formation of hybrid zones. #ornithology #science #wildlife #biology #birds #dogsofinstagram #womeninstem
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[Thanks, Angelica! If YOU are an AOS member and would like to be featured here for a week, please get in touch.]As a lover of the outdoors, I find myself looking for new experiences wherever I can. In the summer of 2018, I took part in a study-abroad intensive led by Dr. McRae and Dr. Kyle Summers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. I engaged in daily and nightly hikes through Pipeline Road and Barro Colorado Island and conversed with the resident scientists about their current studies and long-term research goals on Barro Colorado Island. My experiences in the rainforest encouraged me to pursue work in wildlife biology and conservation. #science #conservation #biology #wildlife #ecology #panama #womeninstem #ornithology
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[Our thanks to AOS member Angelica Reed (@angelicanreed), who's taking over this account for the week!]
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