robert storer, funder of aos's katma award

The next nomination cycle for the AOS Katma Award will open 12 October 2020.

AOS’s Katma Award recognizes papers proposing ideas or testing theories that replace current dogma or settled opinion and that could change the course of thinking about the biology of birds. Papers may also include those that propose a largely untested idea or those that develop and advance it. The award may be given to research articles, short communications, or commentaries (including editorials and reviews) of any length published in any scientific venue within the two preceding years. This unique award was established in 2003 through a generous gift from the late Robert W. Storer.

The award consists of a $2500 prize plus a certificate. Papers with one or two authors are preferred; nomination of papers with several co-authors must specify the contribution of each. Self-nominations are eligible for consideration.

Submit a Nomination

Nominations for the AOS Katma Award are now closed. Please check back in 2020 for the dates of the next nomination cycle.

Nominations must be submitted through our online Member Portal.

  • Clicking “Apply Now” on the page linked above will direct you to a login screen. If you have previously created an account, your Login ID is your email address. After logging in, you will be redirected to the Senior Professional Award nomination page.
  • If you have not previously created an account, click Create Account at the lower left to set up your profile.
  • You can also navigate to the submission page from the Member Portal homepage under “Open Competitions” in the lower right.

Nominations for the Katma Award should include a PDF of the paper or series of papers and a one- to two-page letter describing how the nomination fits the qualifications outlined above.

Previous Katma Award Winners

2020Mikus Abolins-Abols and Mark E. Hauber. 2018. Host defences against avian brood parasitism: an endocrine perspective. Proc. Royal Soc. B 285: 20180980.
2019Benjamin Winger, Giorgia Auteri, Teresa Pegan, & Brian Weeks. 2018. A long winter for the Red Queen: rethinking the evolution of seasonal migration. Biol. Rev. 94: 737-752.
2016Muhammad Asghar, Dennis Hasselquist, Bengt Hansson, Pavel Zehtindjiev, Helena Westerdahl, & Staffan Bensch. 2015. Hidden costs of infection: Chronic malaria accelerates telomere degradation and senescence in wild birds. Science 347: 436-438.
2015Bailey McKay & Robert Zink. 2014. Sisyphean evolution of Darwin’s finches. Biol. Rev. 90: 689-698.
2013Kenneth P. Dial, Brandon E. Jackson, & Paolo Segre. 2008. A fundamental avian wing-stroke provides a new perspective on the evolution of flight. Nature 451: 985-989.
2011Sievert Rohwer, Keith A. Hobson, & Vanya G. Rohwer. 2009. Migratory double breeding in neotropical migrant birds. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106: 19050-19055

From the field

Congratulations to all of the recipients of this year's AOS awards! Our annual awards honor members for their research and volunteer work. The work of the 2020 awardees spans a diversity of ornithological disciplines from genetics to landscape ecology in a range of habitats around the world, as well as invaluable service to AOS and ornithology. This year’s slate of awardees represents just a small sample of the broad diversity of our members and the contributions they are making to the scientific study and conservation of birds. Learn more about all of them at the link in our profile! #ornithology #science #biologyThe charismatic Euphonia and Chlorophonia finches are small, colorful birds that inhabit forests and woodlands from Mexico to Brazil as well as much of the Caribbean, and how exactly they fit into the songbird family tree has been debated for 20 years. The researchers behind a paper recently published in The Auk used tissue specimens and study skins from every species in this group to generate 40 *billion* base pairs of sequence data, including nearly 5,000 loci from the nuclear genome and near-complete mitochondrial genomes for every species. This amazing dataset shows has helped resolve their relationships once and for all. It also suggests that this group likely dispersed from South America into the Caribbean and North America multiple times between 2 and 4 million years ago, lending support to a younger geological timeframe for the formation of the Isthmus of Panama than argued by some other recent studies. Photos by Daniel J. Field (University of Cambridge) and Tyler Imfeld. #ornithology #science #birds #wildlife #neotropicalbirds #taxonomy #biology #finchesOne final #NationalVolunteerWeek post! Meet Rebecca Kimball, longtime AOS volunteer and Treasurer of the society since 2015, one of the leaders helping shape AOS's future. We hope you've enjoyed celebrating Volunteer Week with us!Today for #NationalVolunteerWeek we're featuring Brian Peer, who's given his time to chair the AOS Research Awards Committee for the past eight years, leading the group that evaluates applications for Student Research Awards. Thank you, Brian!AOS is celebrating #NationalVolunteerWeek! Today, meet Kyle Horton, who volunteered his time to judge student presentations at last summer's AOS meeting in Anchorage, Alaska.Today for #NationalVolunteerWeek, meet Lori Hargrove! Lori works at the San Diego Natural History Museum and is a regular reviewer for AOS journal The Condor. Scholarly journals can't function without reviewers like Lori, who volunteer their time to read and assess the papers that are submitted.We're celebrating #NationalVolunteerWeek! AOS couldn't function without the many members who volunteer their time to assist with our meetings, publications, awards, and other programs, and we'll be introducing you to one of those volunteers every day this week. Today, meet Juita Martinez, a PhD student who helped staff the registration desk at last year's annual AOS meeting in Anchorage, Alaska!
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